Will Cunningham Probe Re-Open View into CIA/Organized Crime Networks First Exposed by Iran-Contra & Iraqgate?

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    Ted Kahl
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Check out this article by Joseph Cannon. (It's long, but worth reading in its entirety). Here's a rather crude summary --  it seems Brent Wilkes, who bribed Randy "Duke" Cunningham,  has  a long history with the CIA, and CIA money laundromats, such as the World Finance Corporation (WFC) for which Wilkes worked. A close friend and ally of Wilkes is "Dusty" Foggo, now the #3 man at the CIA, which the Cunningham probe may include. (Don't you just love how these high-level spooky types always have cute nicknames like "Buzzy" Krongard, former #3 at the CIA and former head of AB Brown  that placed those 9/11 put options on the airlines;  "Pug" Winokur of Enron/Dyncorp fame, and of course, "Poppy" Bush...)

Read about how Wilkes and Foggo are seemingly tied into this network of arms sales (Iran-contra and Iragqate), BCCI, drugs (Contra-crack), S&L lootings, etc, etc...(with the Bush Family always popping up somewhere)...as Cannon writes in some key grafs...

Once, in a faraway land called the 1980s, Saddam Hussein and "Poppy" Bush were -- believe it or not! -- the bestest of buds. At that time, some CIA-linked Legitimate Businessmen went over to Iraq to sell military items. Technically, these businessmen were not of the CIA (in the sense of being on the official payroll), yet they maintained close connections to the Agency and to the military. As I've said many times, you can't understand modern history unless you know about these "spooky" informal networks, in which the players receive both start-up capital and connections from covert sources.

[...]

And of course, Reagan's illegal arms sales to Iran resulted in hefty profits being diverted to the contras. That's why they called it the Iran-Contra affair [and WFC and Wilkes helped with the Contra effort].

I've summarized with an almost criminal brevity a lot of sordid history, and I've done so to emphasize one point: Every time a new scandal popped up during the 1980s and early 1990s, the same refrain appeared: "It's all about funding the contras!" Money from arms sales, cocaine, heroin, gold, S&Ls, crooked banks, gambling, software, bribery, Middle East financiers, "patriotic" donations -- it all went toward regime change in the small country of Nicaragua.

Supposedly.

Eventually, a few people started asking the obvious question: How much money did the contras need? Were they firing gold bullets down there?

[...]

ADCS, the company Wilkes headquartered in Poway, was founded on software designed by a German firm called VPMax. I think we should see VPMax's role in this as analogous to that of the Romanian concern which provided those wool uniforms to Saddam Hussein. As I suggested earlier, Wilkes empire is largely a collection of false fronts built on a small foundation of "real" products, usually taken from other, smaller players.

And from there, we enter the current scandal. About which, more to come soon.

Until then, consider: Wilkes' firms received millions of taxpayer dollars; Daniel Hopsicker puts the amount at $700 million, although mainstream journalists speak of a much lower figure. Regardless of the amount, sources agree that the Defense Department did not really like or need his document conversion services. And Wilkes' list of companies included obvious fakes.

So once again, the question confronts us: Where did the money go?

This time, we have a pretty clear answer -- in the form of the many political contributions (and outright bribes) made by Wilkes' many subsidiaries.

For more, see this post by Sherlock Google at the Daily Kos...   

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American Prospect: "Black Contracts"

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Laura Rozen writes: 

On December 8, the Prospect received an anonymous tip about CIA contracts: The name of a Wilkes-affiliated company that allegedly had received some of them. The company is called Archer Logistics, which is, according to its website, a US-based “open source acquisition group … uniquely positioned to execute rapid acquisition requests, provide immediate delivery channels and augment post-sales support. ...Archer Logistics has also developed a unique delivery structure that can provide turnaround times of 24 hours in cases of extreme need.” (Its name is similar to a Senate-registered, Wilkes-affiliate company Archer Defense, “a defense logistics and technology company,” but not, apparently, the same company.) According to its website, incorporation documents in the Commonwealth of Virginia and public-online address books, Archer Logistics is located in the same Chantilly, Virginia address that houses the Virginia offices of ADCS, Inc. Neither Archer Logistics nor the ADCS Chantilly office answered the phone, and neither has responded to numerous messages.

When asked about whether Archer Logistics was receiving CIA contracts, a spokesman for the CIA told the Prospect on December 9 that “as a rule, the CIA does not publicly discuss who may or may not have a contractual relationship with the Agency.” Previously, the CIA had indicated that other Wilkes-affiliated companies – ADCS, Pure Aqua Technologies, Perfect Wave Technologies, Group W Transport – did not have contracts with the Agency.

Incorporation documents from the state of Virginia show that the president of Archer Logistics is Joel G. Combs, an individual who, according to lobbying registration documents filed with the Senate, is a registered lobbyist for Wilkes’ lobbying arm, Group W Advisors. Combs is a former director of business development for another Wilkes-owned company, ADCS, Inc., which stands for Automated Document Conversion Systems. ADCS Inc. has received tens of millions of dollars in Pentagon contracts over the past decade, including a $9.7 million contract to digitize paper documents from the Panama Canal. Efforts to reach Combs at his Group W Advisors’ telephone number, email, and at Archer Logistics were unsuccessful. Sources familiar with the company tell the Prospect, and California birth records indicate, that Combs is a relative of Brent Wilkes.